Wednesday, September 14, 2011

1:30 - 2:00: GNU Radio Roadmap and Vision

Tom Rondeau

Presentation

Audio



2:00 - 3:00: GNU Radio in Action

Johnathan Corgan

Presentation

Audio



3:30 - 5:30: Presentation Session - GNU Radio Applications

3:30 - 4:00

GNU Radio for Quantum Optical Communications

Travis Humble

Abstract

In this talk, we discuss the implementation of quantum optical communication protocols, including quantum key distribution and quantum optical seals, within the GNU Radio framework. We report on our efforts to develop single-photon optical receivers at infrared and visible wavelengths that interface directly with GNU Radio, and our development of QITKAT, a quantum information tool kit for application testing built on top of GNU Radio. While the physics underlying quantum communication distinguish it from conventional radios, we conclude that GNU Radio provides a convenient means for prototyping research-grade implementations of various quantum applications and, subsequently, for diagnosing relative performance.

Presentation

Audio


4:00 - 4:30

OP25 - An Open Source P25 Implementation in GNU Radio

Max Parke

Abstract

Project 25 (APCO-25) is a suite of published standards for two-way digital radio communications.  The not-for-profit OP25 project exists "to bring together folks that are interested in implementing APCO P25 using a software-defined radio ... that is available under the GNU Public License".  The session includes a brief overview of P25 and OP25, hardware options and issues, a look at the OP25 C++ GR blocks and Python apps, and a treatment of problems encountered and pain suffered during development.  Waveforms received from various actual P25 systems (including simulcast) are shown.

Presentation

Audio


4:30 - 5:00

ADS-B in GNU Radio

Nick Foster

Abstract

Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast forms the core of the next-generation air traffic control system. With compliance already mandatory in Europe, and in the US by 2020, adoption of the new system is growing exponentially. This talk presents a practical design approach to a packet-based receiver in GNU Radio using ADS-B as an example to demonstrate sample tagging, accurate timestamps with UHD and gr-uhd, and message queues. Additionally, a system for multilaterating noncompliant aircraft positions using multiple, geographically-distributed networked devices is demonstrated.

Presentation

Audio


 5:00 - 5:30

 Open Discussion on Polyphase Filterbanks

 Led by Tom Rondeau

 Abstract

Polyphase filterbanks, while not exactly new, are an exciting field of signal processing to perform some powerful and interesting applications. GNU Radio has introduced many polyphase filterbank tools and methods that greatly simplify and speed-up the processing of many signals. In a few cases, they offer new techniques that GNU Radio was never able to do before.

This session will be a basic discussion of the polyphase filterbank concept in general and what is included in GNU Radio. It is designed as an open session for audience questions and discussions as a way to help the development community understand what these techniques can do and how to employ them.

Presentation


Thursday, September 15, 2011

9:00 - 9:30: Opening Remarks

Tom Rondeau

Presentation

Audio



9:00 - 9:30: Reality Bites... Why doesn't my signal look like the textbook?

Matt Ettus

Presentation

GRC Files

Audio (Part 1)

Audio (Part 2)

Audio (Part 3)



1:30 - 3:30 Open Presentation / Discussion Session

Topic area: Developing Developers and GNU Radio in Education

Presentations:

Using GNU Radio in academic education

Martin Braun

Abstract

At the Communications Engineering Lab (CEL) of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), GNU Radio and the USRP have become a useful tool not only for lab experiments, but also as part of the education process. In this presentation we will show some examples of how GNU Radio was used as part of the curriculum, and discuss strengths and weaknesses of this software radio framework as an educational tool.

Presentation



4:00 - 6:00: Presentation Session - GNU Radio Architecture

4:00 - 4:30

Event-based Scheduler

Tim O'Shea

4:30 - 5:00

The VOLK Is for the People: On-Chip, Hand-Coded Optimization in an Unaccommodating World

Nick McCarthy

 

Presentation

Audio


5:00 - 5:30

Introduction to Stream Tags

Tom Rondeau

 

Abstract

 GNU Radio's data flow model is the core of how samples are passed from block to block. This model works for a large number of waveforms and it remains the major mode of moving information around. However, many waveforms, especially packetized digital signals, require more logic than the basic data flow model enables, and as such, we have implemented a secondary, parallel stream of information to carry message tags. These stream tags contain polymorphic tuples that are tagged to specific sample numbers and can contain any type of data or information to add a later of data, metadata, or logic to the GNU Radio flowgraph. This talk will explain in more detail how the stream tags work and present some examples of where they can be used.

Presentation

Audio



Friday, September 16, 2011

9:00 - 9:30

Contributing to GNU Radio

Johnathan Corgan

 

Presentation

Audio



10:30 - 11:00

Advance GNU Radio to the Network Level: Progress, Opportunities and Challenges

Feng (Andrew) Ge, PhD
Telcordia Technologies, Inc., Piscataway, NJ
fge@telcordia.com

 

Abstract

In the past ten years, GNU Radio (and USRP) has emerged rapidly as the No. 1 SDR platform in academia research, being widely used for R&D in cognitive radio, RF signal processing, public safety, satellite reception, etc. When moving to the network level, however, its success has been limited—even though several GNU Radio-based network testbeds have been built. The challenges are multi-fold. In this talk, we examine those challenges and introduce our progress on advancing GNU Radio to the network level. We make three contributions: (1) Developed an outdoor MANET testbed with 10+ GNU Radio nodes, which is capable of network monitoring and adaptation across the whole protocol stack from the application layer to the physical layer; (2) Built a ten-node GNU Radio-based cognitive radio network, which enables distributed cooperative spectrum sensing, dynamic spectrum access, and multi-channel allocation; (3) Analyzed throughput of non-persistent carrier sense multiple-access (CSMA) based on GNU Radio and examined the impact of SDR execution latency on CSMA performance.

In summary, GNU Radio faces challenges when meeting the network; however, they can be overcome with dedicated research, as indicated by our work. With its unprecedented flexibility, GNU Radio holds strong potential to shape the landscape of wireless networks [1–11].

REFERENCES
[1] M. Dohler, R. W. Heath, A. Lozano, C. B. Papadias, and R. A. Valenzuela, “Is the phy layer dead?” IEEE Communications Magazine, vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 159 –165, april 2011.
[2] A. Goldsmith, M. Effros, R. Koetter, M. Me anddard, A. Ozdaglar, and L. Zheng, “Beyond shannon: the quest for fundamental performance limits of wireless ad hoc networks,” Communications Magazine, IEEE, vol. 49, no. 5, pp. 195 –205, may 2011.
[3] M. Vutukuru, H. Balakrishnan, and K. Jamieson, “Cross-layer wireless bit rate adaptation,” SIGCOMM Comput. Commun. Rev., vol. 39, no. 4, pp. 3–14, 2009.
[4] S. Sen, R. Roy Choudhury, and S. Nelakuditi, “CSMA/CN: carrier sense multiple access with collision notification,” i n Proceedings of the sixteenth annual international conference on Mobile computing and networking, ser. MobiCom ’10, 2010, pp. 25–36.
[5] L. Yang, Z. Zhang, W. Hou, B. Y. Zhao, and H. Zheng, “Papyrus: a software platform for distributed dynamic spectrum sharing using sdrs,” SIGCOMM Comput. Commun. Rev., vol. 41, pp. 31–37, 2011.
[6] F. Ge, et al., “Software radio-based decentralized dynamic spectrum access networks: A prototype design and experimental results,” in IEEE Global Communications Conference, 2010.
[7] S. Gollakota and D. Katabi, “Zigzag decoding: combating hidden terminals in wireless networks,” SIGCOMM Comput. Commun. Rev., vol. 38, pp. 159–170, August 2008.
[8] K. Wu, H. Tan, Y. Liu, J. Zhang, Q. Zhang, and L. Ni, “Side channel: bits over interference,” in Proceedings of the sixteenth annual international conference on Mobile computing and networking, 2010, pp. 13–24.
[9] G. Nychis, T. Hottelier, Z. Yang, S. Seshan, and P. Steenkiste, “Enabling MAC protocol implementations on software-defined radios,” in Networked Systems Design and Implementation, 2009.
[10] F. Ge, C. J. Chiang, Y. M. Gottlieb, and R. Chadha, “GNU Radio-based digital communications: Computational analysis of a GMSK transceiver,” in IEEE Global Communications Conference, 2011.
[11] S. Borkar and A. A. Chien, “The future of microprocessors,” Communications of the ACM, vol. 54, pp. 67–77, 2011.

 

Presentation




1:30 - 3:00: Presentation Session - Hardware for Software Radio

1:00 - 1:30

The USRP product line

Matt Ettus


1:30 - 2:00

UHD driver for USRPs

Josh Blum

Presentation

Audio


2:00 - 2:30

An Alternative Hardware Platform for GNU Radio

Tao Wang

Abstract

This presentation describes S-Mini, an alternative hardware platform that works with GNU Radio. Inspired by USRP, iPhone, Ruby-on-Rails, and BeagleBoard, S-Mini is a general-purpose SDR platform that is tailored for industrial applications. It is a well-designed series of SDRs for the GNU Radio community. It has high build quality, minimum learning curve, and acceptable price range for end users. The presentation also mentions the architecture of S-Mini, similarities shared by the S-Mini and USRP, and differences between them. It also introduces the author’s understanding of the GNU Radio ecosystem.

Presentation

Audio


2:30 - 3:00

A Standalone Package for Bringing Graphics Processor Acceleration to GNU Radio: GRGPU

William Plishker
University of Maryland, College Park

Abstract
With higher bandwidth requirements and more complex protocols, software defined radio (SDR) has ever growing computational demands. SDR applications have different levels of parallelism that can be exploited on multicore platforms, but design and programming difficulties have inhibited the adoption of specialized multicore platforms like graphics processors (GPUs).  In this work, a new design flow is discussed that augments GNU Radio with a dataflow foundation that leverages a stand-alone GPU accelerated library for GNU Radio called GRGPU. GRGPU gives an SDR developer the ability to prototype a GPU accelerated application and explore its design space fast and effectively.  A standard SDR benchmark is demonstrated that shows that deciding how to utilize a GPU can be non-trivial for even relatively simple applications.